pun_logo

The Society for the study of flies (Diptera)

Affiliated to the British Entomological and Natural History Society (BENHS)

You are not logged in.

#1 2012-12-16 22:25:41

Marc Taylor
DF Members
Name: Marc Taylor
Registered: 2010-05-06
Posts: 44

Labeling specimens

May I ask for opinion as to whether the addition of the authority of a species is a must on all Det. labels.

For the fixed data (upper) label I use:
County, Site, Gridref, VC, Method, collector and date of capture

I currently use on the determination label (lower):
Taxon, authority,gender,determiner, date of determination

I ask in order to reduce label content, I print in 3pt Trubuchet font.

Thanks in advance.

Offline

 

#2 2012-12-17 00:29:46

Tony Irwin
DF Members
Name: Tony Irwin
From: Norwich
Registered: 2008-03-01
Posts: 825

Re: Labeling specimens

Ideally the authority is included (it is an integral part of any species name). However in practice, if you are using the names as given in the current British Check List, then the authority is not essential. Better that the genus and species are legible - 3 pt is quite small! (and some names are quite long!)

Offline

 

#3 2012-12-17 13:30:59

Marc Taylor
DF Members
Name: Marc Taylor
Registered: 2010-05-06
Posts: 44

Re: Labeling specimens

Tony

Thank you, I normally print labels in 4pt, but thought I'd seen others use 3pt and felt it was worth a go. Acknowledging the need for spectacles these days 4pt is readable without too much difficulty, 3pt on the others hand was pushing it when I did my test print yesterday and I did have doubts.

The specimens I refer to will be British and taken from the latest naming texts. I'll think on further before deciding, cheers.

Marc

Offline

 

#4 2012-12-17 22:16:39

conopid
DF Members
Name: Nigel Jones
From: Shrewsbury
Registered: 2008-02-27
Posts: 701
Website

Re: Labeling specimens

This is an interesting quandary!

Well, for my part after years of including all the data and author names etc that we are supposed to, but consequently ending up with a huge backlog of specimens awaiting proper labels that I have to type up on a laptop, I have very recently reverted to hand writing (as I go) short labels with:

Site name
VC number
Date collected
Collector name

If I have the grid ref to hand I add this, but I don't spend time looking it up if I have not previously done so in my field notebook.

I have been omitting the author name on the data label.

The result is that I am now at least keeping up with labelling specimens as I work through them, with minimal data that should mean something to someone in future. Enough I hope to permit a future worker to work out where the beast came from and what species I thought it was. In this respect I always use a site-name that is used on an OS 25:000 scale map. If the site is known by a name not shown on the OS map, I use this followed by the most appropriate nearby location on the OS map.

Assuming that a museum would be interested in inheriting my collection (I like to think it would be of some value), what I do do is make a good full label for any important specimens such as the Callicera rufa collected in Shropshire this year.

This feels like a confessional!!

smile

Last edited by conopid (2012-12-17 22:17:44)


Nigel Jones
Shropshire

Offline

 

#5 2012-12-17 22:19:12

conopid
DF Members
Name: Nigel Jones
From: Shrewsbury
Registered: 2008-02-27
Posts: 701
Website

Re: Labeling specimens

PS 4pt gets my vote or hand-write with a Copic .03mm fine nib.


Nigel Jones
Shropshire

Offline

 

#6 2012-12-21 05:18:45

schultmay
DF Members
Name: Barbara Ismay
Registered: 2008-02-14
Posts: 135

Re: Labeling specimens

We use pre-printed labels for ids with det. name and year of determination and leave a gap to write the species name and gender sign above; we usually don't give authorities - this could look like:
Lipara similis m (use gender sign if handwritten)
det. B. Ismay 2011 (printed)

We sometimes add some habitat data, e.g. chalk grassland or brownfield site or even more, but this could end up on a second label.
Our labels also contain Scotland or Wales or England ..., VC, nearest town or NNR or other official name that should still exist in quite a while.

Hope this helps,

Barbara

Offline

 

#7 2012-12-21 18:17:42

Steve Crellin
DF Members
Name: Steve Crellin
From: Isle of Man
Registered: 2008-03-10
Posts: 33

Re: Labeling specimens

This might be of interest too.

http://www.entommedia.com/labelmaker.html

Steve

Offline

 

#8 2012-12-27 13:09:59

Andrew Cunningham
DF Members
Name: Andrew Cunningham
From: Devon, UK.
Registered: 2010-11-05
Posts: 911

Re: Labeling specimens

I have been using Neusiedler 200gsm card for printing my labels.

The printing is not sharp but that might be down to my printer not the card. My main dissatisfaction with this card is that if the label gets moved slightly on the pin for inspection it becomes loose and spins round in transit. Therefore, my specimens often look a mess in their box and I have to carefully pick them out to avoid damage by stray labels.

So I would like to know what card and pin combinations people are using with satisfaction.

Regards,
Andrew.

Last edited by Andrew Cunningham (2012-12-27 13:10:15)

Offline

 

#9 2013-01-04 01:54:08

KenMerrifield
Administrator
Name: Ken Merrifield
Registered: 2008-02-21
Posts: 268

Re: Labeling specimens

Hi Andrew,
I initially thought perhaps card you are using is a heavy grade and has excessive momentum when the specimen is moved, however I would not think that 200gsm would be too thick. I have used a medium weight, acid free, writing paper and it is reasonably stable on the pins even when the containers have been transported considerable distances by car or public transport. I do not know the thickness but it must be less than 200gsm weight.
I was surprised to find how few books give a recommendation for label material. An old one suggested using the thinnest grade of Bristol Board, but said that it was very expensive.
Is the printing sharper with other papers? If so it is worth checking if both sides of the card are suitable for printing (e.g. some photocopier papers have a roughened lower surface to give better grip for the feed rollers and a smoother printing surface).
I have seen the recommendation that if a label becomes loose on the pin that it should be removed and placed face-down on a level surface then a blunt instrument, such as the handle of a pair of scissors, used to press the back of the label to close up the pin hole. The usual warning about never removing labels from more than one specimen at a time applies.

Offline

 

#10 2013-01-04 13:53:55

Tony Irwin
DF Members
Name: Tony Irwin
From: Norwich
Registered: 2008-03-01
Posts: 825

Re: Labeling specimens

I've been using 160 gsm bright white card - goes through my Canon MP600 inkjet with no problems. With this card I seldom have any difficulty about labels swinging loose - it was certainly more of a problem when printing on standard weight paper. Where this does happen, there's usually enough space to re-pin the label. At the museum, we have some older specimens glued directly to thick card, and they do sometimes start turning on their pins. The simplest solution when this happens is to fix a drop of glue under the card around the pin.
The official Canon ink is (so far, after several years) water- and alcohol-proof. Of course this needs checking on a regular basis. Printer manufacturers are notorious for changing ink formulae with no notice or warning.

Offline

 

#11 2013-01-04 23:45:10

Andrew Cunningham
DF Members
Name: Andrew Cunningham
From: Devon, UK.
Registered: 2010-11-05
Posts: 911

Re: Labeling specimens

Hello Ken and Tony,

Thanks for the feedback.

KenMerrifield wrote:

Is the printing sharper with other papers? If so it is worth checking if both sides of the card are suitable for printing (e.g. some photocopier papers have a roughened lower surface to give better grip for the feed rollers and a smoother printing surface).

I have never thought of that but never noticed anything that would suggest so but I shall test this theory. If not then I shall try a different brand of card.

KenMerrifield wrote:

I have seen the recommendation that if a label becomes loose on the pin that it should be removed and placed face-down on a level surface then a blunt instrument, such as the handle of a pair of scissors, used to press the back of the label to close up the pin hole. The usual warning about never removing labels from more than one specimen at a time applies.

That is a good no-nonsense suggestion. I shall give this a go.

Tony Irwin wrote:

The simplest solution when this happens is to fix a drop of glue under the card around the pin.

I did consider glue but thought the cards were meant to be rotatable by anyone who wishes to examine the labels when inspecting the specimen. I shall do this if Ken's 'hole squashing' suggestion does not work.

Regards,
Andrew.

Offline

 

#12 2013-01-05 00:17:56

Tony Irwin
DF Members
Name: Tony Irwin
From: Norwich
Registered: 2008-03-01
Posts: 825

Re: Labeling specimens

My suggestion about gluing the card applies to mounting cards (to which the specimens are fixed). If I have a rotating label, I take it off and re-pin it in a different spot.

Offline

 

#13 2013-01-05 01:19:16

Andrew Cunningham
DF Members
Name: Andrew Cunningham
From: Devon, UK.
Registered: 2010-11-05
Posts: 911

Re: Labeling specimens

Tony Irwin wrote:

My suggestion about gluing the card applies to mounting cards (to which the specimens are fixed). If I have a rotating label, I take it off and re-pin it in a different spot.

Ah, sorry for the misunderstanding Tony.

Regards,
Andrew.

Offline

 

#14 2013-01-05 19:27:41

brianh
DF Members
Name: Brian Harding
From: Kidlington, Oxfordshire
Registered: 2008-10-27
Posts: 326

Re: Labeling specimens

A warning about using 200 gsm card.  I use a laser printer which is permanent (unlike some inkjet printers).  But the maximum recommended card weight is 160 gsm.  I did use 200gsm card, but then I had a problem with the printer which needed a repair.  The microswitch which detects the card was no longer working - possibly because the 200gsm card was too thick/stiff for it.  I may just have been unlucky, but it could have been expensive had it not been repaired under guarantee.

I have not had any problems with 160 gsm card becoming loose in general use, or in transport.

Offline

 

#15 2013-01-06 00:43:23

Andrew Cunningham
DF Members
Name: Andrew Cunningham
From: Devon, UK.
Registered: 2010-11-05
Posts: 911

Re: Labeling specimens

brianh wrote:

A warning about using 200 gsm card.  I use a laser printer which is permanent (unlike some inkjet printers).  But the maximum recommended card weight is 160 gsm.  I did use 200gsm card, but then I had a problem with the printer which needed a repair.  The microswitch which detects the card was no longer working - possibly because the 200gsm card was too thick/stiff for it.  I may just have been unlucky, but it could have been expensive had it not been repaired under guarantee.

I have not had any problems with 160 gsm card becoming loose in general use, or in transport.

Luckily, my printer accepts 200gsm without any trouble. Anything thicker doesn't get picked up at all.

Regards,
Andrew.

Offline

 

#16 2013-01-06 21:30:14

KenMerrifield
Administrator
Name: Ken Merrifield
Registered: 2008-02-21
Posts: 268

Re: Labeling specimens

Many laser printes have a manual-feed tray which which could be better with thicker card as it may not have to follow a convoluted path from the main paper tray. My HP laser also has a hatch at the back which can be opened to allow the paper to come straight out of the printer without bending through 180 degrees to the collection tray on the top.

Offline

 

#17 2013-01-07 13:26:31

Erica
Committee
Name: Erica McAlister
Registered: 2008-03-11
Posts: 35

Re: Labeling specimens

HI All,

for what it's worth this is the format for the Diptera section at the NHM;

We use 170 grams, pure white and is archival quality 100% Rag acid free. we get it from Conservation by design (code is PAHPKC4701 - heritage archival pHOTOKraft (white white))

we usually buy A2 and they cut it down for us. they could probably provide smaller quantities etc but we need a large amount smile

we do not use laser printers at the moment - we use inkjets as they are better at absorbing the inks although we have not ruled them out for the future. 

The font we use is 4.5 arial. 

and for the actual labels
the top label is the Location/sampling/date label
the 2nd one is the collector lable and BM number (the accession number into the collection and so museum specific)
and the 3rd is the det lable (with date and author)

Cheers
Erica

Offline

 

#18 2013-01-07 16:34:04

Mark
DF Members
Name: Mark Mitchell
From: Hampshire
Registered: 2008-06-17
Posts: 273

Re: Labeling specimens

Andrew Cunningham wrote:

brianh wrote:

I have not had any problems with 160 gsm card becoming loose in general use, or in transport.

Luckily, my printer accepts 200gsm without any trouble. Anything thicker doesn't get picked up at all.

My HP (LaserJet 1320) picks up 350gsm fine - it make a strange noises as it passes through the works, but always seems to print fine.

Most of the time I use 200gsm Acid free - purchased off Ebay.

Last edited by Mark (2013-01-07 16:34:29)

Offline

 

#19 2013-03-25 00:35:47

KenMerrifield
Administrator
Name: Ken Merrifield
Registered: 2008-02-21
Posts: 268

Re: Labeling specimens

There has been a discussion on the subject of specimen labels on the Amateur Entomologists Society Yahoo Discussion Group, at the link below-

http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/aes/message/4065

You may need to have a Yahoo account to view this discussion; another Label-printing link was given -
http://www.insectnet.com/downloads.htm

I forgot to add-
There is a downloadable data label template on the BWARS web site
http://www.bwars.com/sites/www.bwars.co … ate_UK.doc

A comprehensive account at-
http://www.biology.ualberta.ca/bsc/brie … ndards.htm Biological Survey of Canada; Scientific Briefs, incl. Data Label Standards voucher specimens

-=KEN=-

Last edited by KenMerrifield (2013-03-27 00:45:26)

Offline

 

#20 2019-02-21 21:28:23

KenMerrifield
Administrator
Name: Ken Merrifield
Registered: 2008-02-21
Posts: 268

Re: Labeling specimens

Having re-visited this thread to remove a spammer's response I think that I omitted to mention that I was told by a Service Manager at a large copier/printer company that when using card with a laser printer it is important to set the card weight in the Print Options settings. If it is left at the default setting for standard paper the fuser drum may not be hot enough to fuse the toner to thicker card before it passes through the rollers. This may explain why a Curator once told me not to use a laser printer with card as the letters always came off (not my experience if the paper weight is set correctly).

Offline

 

Board footer

Powered by PunBB
© Copyright 2002–2005 Rickard Andersson